Eye Technology to Review Goals Made in Soccer Matches

Eye Technology to Review Goals Made in Soccer Matches

The Associated Press, via Sports Illustrated is reporting that FIFA’s governing board is set to approve the use of electronic technology to assist referees in discerning if goals have been made during play. The Irish Times says fans have been rallying for the implementation of the technology in international play after several clear mistakes made by officials in recent matches. The most prominent of the new technologies to be approved is the Hawk Eye system that uses lasers to track the motion of objects, such as tennis balls at Wimbledon. If the measure is passed, the new technology would be used throughout the 2014 World Cup.

The move comes about, the AP says partly due to the efforts of FIFA president Sepp Blatter, who until somewhat recently was strongly opposed to the idea of using technology to detect goals, his reasoning being that it would spoil the competitive nature of the game. In just the past two years however, there have been two very blatant errors made by referees, both times in matches involving the team from England. In the first case, the error went against the British, in the second for them. But either way, because the errors occurred during tournament play, the outcomes caused ripples throughout the rest of the tournament that left both players and spectators feeling uneasy. It was because of these blatant errors that Blatter finally came around and has of late been leading the charge to implement the new technology.

Besides the Hawk Eye system, another competitor is also expected to be approved for tournament play; GoalRef, a system that uses magnetic sensors to follow ball movement. But because of Hawk Eye’s proven track record in other sports, it’s expected that technology will eventually win out overall.

The Times reports that unlike in tennis matches, the electronic system will be used to aid officials in determining goal scoring, not as a decider, which most believe would lead to resentment against the technology. Because of this, it’s possible that the technology will be consulted in private as is done currently between referees on the field when difficult calls have to be made.

Prior to this most recent move, the AP says, FIFA officials had been considering adding referees to the field of play, most specifically on either side of goal borders to assist in helping to decide if a ball has crossed the plane during play. And while that option has been tested to some degree, most agree that doing so would not offer nearly the same degree of precision as an electronic system. Chilling the Air in Arizona?Great expectations for the 2010 Iowa Football team spiraled downward at the end of the season. Think twice before you log into the Hawkeye Report Message Boards.

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